The October Birth Flowers are Marigold and Cosmos

The birth flowers for October are warm marigolds and dainty cosmos which flower in the month of October in the Northern Hemisphere.

October Birth Flower: Marigold

The primary birthday flower for October is the Marigold of the genus Tagetes, native to the Americas. Flowers of the Calendula genus are also known as marigolds and are native to regions of Asia and Europe.

Marigold flowers occur in warm golden, orange, yellow, and white colors, often with maroon accents.

There are many well known cultivated varieties of marigolds such as African and French marigolds.

The common name marigold originates from 'Mary's gold', an earlier name given to one of these plants.

Marigold garlands are often used in cultural events in Mexico, Nepal and India and it is one of the national symbols in the Ukraine.

The language of flowers introduced in Victorian times says that marigolds symbolize sorrow and  sympathy.

October Birth Flower: Cosmos

The second October flower is the Cosmos which occurs in many colors, including the pink and white colors of October. Cosmos grows very easily provided there is no frost and can bloom throughout summer into early fall.

The group of plants that make up the Cosmos genus originate across North, Central and South America and consists of about twenty species. Many hybrids and cultivars have been bred from the natural wild flowers.

Cosmos is the Greek word for harmony or ordered universe. It is believed Spanish priests in Mexico gave the flower this name due to the evenly spaced petals.

Cosmos is the flower to commemorate a second wedding anniversary.

Birth flower reference: Floriography Today by S. Theresa Dietz



This interesting article covers the history, meaning and uses of October's flower Calendula, another name for Marigold.

October's Calendula: Flowers for Any Occasion

By 

October's birth flower, the Calendula, is truly a symbol of fall and crisp mornings. It's bright golden and burnt color palette makes it reminiscent of a beautiful autumn sunrise. Also referred to as the Pot Marigold, the Calendula is truly a delight for florists and in the garden due to it's beautiful color and it's hardy nature. Whether potted as a unique holiday gift or planted in your border, the Calendula will delight and inspire.

History, Meanings and Uses

The Calendula's name comes from the English "calendar". It is said that the Calendula took this name because of it's monthly blooms. Monks used to enjoy its beautiful blossoms year-round as the flowers would surround their altars and bloom until they were covered with snow.

Like the Sunflower, the Calendula's blossoms follow the sun, and were used as protection against evil by early Christians. The Calendula represents affection, jealousy, grief and many other feelings associated with love.

The Calendula uses are well known throughout the culinary and homeopathic healing worlds. In the kitchen, the Calendula is used to brighten up and add a slightly spicy flavor to greens. The petals were also used to substitute for saffron in the cooking pots of the poor - hence the name "Pot Marigold."

The medicinal uses of the Calendula are almost limitless. Its leaves and petals can be used for everything as a tincture for headaches to an ointment for insect bites. Oil from the seeds is used in soap products and the extract, to combat acne.

Birthday Card with October Flowers Marigold and Cosmos
October Flower Birthday Card by Rugosa and Pine
October Birthday Flower Card Cosmos
Hand Quilled October Cosmos Card by Craft Speak Studios

Cultivation

Like their cousin, the Common Marigold, the Calendula is extremely hardy and weather resistant. They can withstand a moderate frost and do well in full sun or part-shade. They actually thrive in cool weather and will bloom until the ground is completely frozen.

Plant Calendula seeds mid-spring and be sure to deadhead often to prolong blooming. They like rich, well drained soil but can survive just about anywhere and are perfect to mix into your vegetable patch for a shock of color.

Go ahead and stock your gardens full of Calendula. They are perfect for unique holiday gifts; a Thanksgiving table would shine with their bright golden blooms. They are perfect for bridal bouquets and a simple token to show your appreciation and feelings. And they are a gardener's delight; as hardy and useful as the day is long.

Lilly Gordon is a freelance web writer and publisher. She is an avid gardener and is fascinated with floriculture and is a floral design enthusiast.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Lilly_Gordon/677416


Article republished with permission from EzineArticles.com

Books about the Language of Flowers

Preview the following fascinating books about the history and meanings of flowers: